Saturday, May 29, 2010

Psalm 2 by David Q. Santos

Psalm 2:


David Q. Santos

John 5:39 Search the scriptures; for in them ye think ye have eternal life: and they are they which testify of me.
In John chapter five Jesus confronts the Pharisees and Sadducees . He scolds them for not recognizing Jesus as the long awaited Messiah. The Pharisees were exceedingly meticulous in every detail of the Law of Moses.[1] With all this knowledge of scripture they would not accept Jesus for who He was; the Son of God, and the long awaited Messiah. Throughout scripture Jesus is pointed too; there are both pictures and prophesies that speak of his coming. To anyone who truly understands the scriptures the identity of Christ should be obvious.

Acts 17:11 These were more noble than those in Thessalonica, in that they received the word with all readiness of mind, and searched the scriptures daily, whether those things were so.
In the book of Acts the Boreans were given the Gospel of Jesus Christ. They responded by going to the scripture and studying it. They determined that the Gospel was of God by authenticating what they were told by the scripture. In studying the scripture the Boreans must have gone to the Pentateuch or the law first. They most definitely searched the words of the prophets. They most definitely found the messianic passages found in the Psalms. Throughout the psalms the messiah is spoken of. The psalms give many amazing prophesies about the person of and signs of the Messiah.

There are 15 Psalms classified as Messianic Psalms. These are psalms 2, 8, 16, 22, 23, 24, 31, 40, 41, 45, 68, 69, 102, 110, and 118. Out of this group of Psalms two have the distinction of being the Psalms that are quoted or alluded to more frequently than any other in the New Testament. Psalm 2 and Psalm 110 were each quoted or eluded to 14 times.

While each of these Psalms are used in the New Testament 14 times Psalm 2 has three times more separate verses spoken of. Verses 1, 2, 7, 8, 9, and 11 are used in the New Testament.[2] Those verses do not include the multiple times that the 2nd psalm is alluded to in the book of Acts. The book of Acts attributes this psalm to David while also providing evidence that the book of Psalms was in the same form in the apostolic day as it is today.[3] That being the case the Pharisees that were staunch adversaries of Jesus must have read Psalm 2 verse 7 which says, “I will declare the decree: the LORD hath said unto me, Thou art my Son; this day have I begotten thee.” David Malick points to seven verses in the New Testament where Jesus is spoken of as the Son of God. They are; Mathew 3:17, 17:5, Mark 1:11, 9:7, Luke 3:22, 9:35, and John 1:49.[4]

The first of those six verses are God’s testimony of who Jesus really was. When Jesus was baptized by His forerunner John the Baptist in the Jordan River the sky opened up and a voice spoke of Jesus saying, “This is my Son in whom I am well pleased.”(Mathew 3:13-17, Mark 1:9-11, and Luke 3:21-23). It is easy to surmise that the Pharisees knew about this event. Jesus points out to the religious leaders, during a typical discourse with them, that God the Father had “bore witness” of him (John 8:18). But even with their great knowledge of scripture they ignored the testimony of the Father.

Some chose to reject Jesus as Messiah because they were seeking the Christ that was spoken of in verse 8 and 9 of the second Psalm. They were seeking the Messiah that we know will be the second coming of Jesus. The Church awaits His triumphant return where every knee will bow and every tongue confess (Romans 14:11).

Psalm 2 has four divisions. The first division is verse 1-3. The second division is verses 4-6. The third division is found in verses 7-9. The fourth and final division is found in verses 10-12.

1 ¶ Why do the heathen rage, and the people imagine a vain thing? 2 The kings of the earth set themselves, and the rulers take counsel together, against the LORD, and against his anointed, saying, 3 Let us break their bands asunder, and cast away their cords from us.
The first three verses of this Psalm describe the state of the world at the time of Christ’s return. The rulers of the earth have set their nations in an uproar. The kings of the world have set their nation’s will against the Lord. One of the most striking New Testament parallel to this portion of the second psalm is found in the Book of Revelation. Revelation 11:18 paints a picture of the world in future times. It says, “And the nations were angry, and thy wrath is come, and the time of the dead, that they should be judged, and that thou shouldest give reward unto thy servants the prophets, and to the saints, and them that fear thy name, small and great; and shouldest destroy them which destroy the earth.”

Mathew Henry makes an important point of this section. He says, “Princes and people, court and country, have sometimes separate interests, but here they are united against Christ; not the mighty only, but the mob, the heathen, the people, numbers of them, communities of them.”[5] It is not only the ruling class that are set against the Lord but also the common people.

4 He that sitteth in the heavens shall laugh: the Lord shall have them in derision. 5 Then shall he speak unto them in his wrath, and vex them in his sore displeasure. 6 Yet have I set my king upon my holy hill of Zion.
Verse 4 is the Lord’s reaction to the uproar of man. Verses 5 and 6 are God’s reply to the plans of the rulers of the world.[6] These verses describe in human terms God’s reaction to the world setting their minds against Him. In verse four He sits in the heavens and laughs at man’s attempt to change His will. The reaction is to set His righteous wrath against them and set His king as ruler. This king is Jesus Christ. He will be ruling from Jerusalem with a rod of iron (psalm 2:9, Revelation 2:27, 12:5, and 19:15).

7 ¶ I will declare the decree: the LORD hath said unto me, Thou art my Son; this day have I begotten thee. 8 Ask of me, and I shall give thee the heathen for thine inheritance, and the uttermost parts of the earth for thy possession. 9 Thou shalt break them with a rod of iron; thou shalt dash them in pieces like a potter’s vessel.
The psalmist now spoke of God’s affirmation of the king to show by what right the king rules. The decree refers to the Davidic covenant in which God declared that He would be Father to the king, and the king would be His son. So when David became king, God described their affiliation as a Father-son relationship. So the expression “son” took on the meaning of the messianic title.[7] 2 Samuel 7:14 is a pivotal verse when studying this psalm. It says, “I will be his father, and he shall be my son. If he commit iniquity, I will chasten him with the rod of men, and with the stripes of the children of men:” “He shall be my Son” is a phrase that recognizes the Davidic covenant. The phrase “Thou art my Son;” is an important one to understand. In the book of Acts 13:33 Paul illustrates the fulfillment of this phrase. He said, “God hath fulfilled the same unto us their children, in that he hath raised up Jesus again; as it is also written in the second psalm, Thou art my Son, this day have I begotten thee.” The JFB commentary makes the outstanding point that the phrase in Acts 13:33 “raised up” does not refer to the resurrection but to the anointing as messiah and fulfillment of the Davidic Covenant.[8]

Further, to satisfy us that his kingdom is well-grounded upon his sonship, we are here told what his sonship is grounded on: this day have I begotten thee which refers both to his eternal generation itself, for it is quoted (#Heb 1:5) to prove that he is the brightness of his Father’s glory and the express image of his person.[9]

Verse 9 is a powerful verse that appears three separate times in the Book of Revelation (2:27, 12:5, and 19:15). Mathew Poole writes of this phrase, “And he shall rule them with a rod of iron: an iron rod either signifies a right rod, that will not be easily bent and made crooked; or a severe rod, which is most probably the sense: see #Ps 2:9 Ps 12:5. The words by the psalmist are applied to Christ, and to the church, #Re 12:5: to particular saints here, who rule the nations either in Christ their Head, or with Christ as their Chieftain, with the word of God powerfully convincing the world of sin and righteousness.”[10]

10 ¶ Be wise now therefore, O ye kings: be instructed, ye judges of the earth. 11 Serve the LORD with fear, and rejoice with trembling. 12 Kiss the Son, lest he be angry, and ye perish from the way, when his wrath is kindled but a little. Blessed are all they that put their trust in him.
The fourth and final division of this psalm is an exhortation of the psalmist. It is in essence the Gospel message. The psalmist seems to plead with the nations to wisely serve the Lord with fear. Proverbs 9:10 tells us that the fear of the LORD is the beginning of wisdom. Mathew Henry wrote of this portion of the second psalm,

“We have here the practical application of this gospel doctrine concerning the kingdom of the Messiah, by way of exhortation to the kings and judges of the earth. They hear that it is in vain to oppose Christ’s government; let them therefore be so wise for themselves as to submit to it.” He goes on to say, “The Father is angry already; the Son is the Mediator that undertakes to make peace;” He concludes by writing, “In singing this, and praying it over, we should have our hearts filled with a holy awe of God, but at the same time borne up with a cheerful confidence in Christ, in whose mediation we may comfort and encourage ourselves and one another. We are the circumcision, that rejoice in Christ Jesus.”

The Pharisees and Sadducees of the first century missed Jesus both in scripture and in person. However, that will not be the case for the rulers that set themselves against God in the Day of the Lord. When Jesus comes this time He will come as the Lion of the Tribe of Judah. He will take up his rod of Iron and rule from the Holy Hill of Zion.

This second psalm serves to show us two sides of Jesus. One is the wrath on those that seek to place themselves on His throne. They will be broken into pieces with a rod of iron like a potter’s vessel. But if we accept our gift of salvation we can see the other side of Christ. We can be wise and kiss the Son of God who died to shed His blood for us and wash away the sins that we all have. When we accept Christ we are seen by God as pure.

Acts 2:21 And it shall come to pass, that whosoever shall call on the name of the Lord shall be saved.
Acts 10:43 To him give all the prophets witness, that through his name whosoever believeth in him shall receive remission of sins.

WORK CITED

Copeland, Mark A. Executable Outlines, Psalm 2: 2004. http://www.ccel.org



Gill, John. John Gill’s Expositor: The Introduction to Psalm 2. The Online Bible Millennium Edition, version 1.2. Winterbourne Ontario, Canada. 2001



Henry, Mathew. Mathew Henry Commentary Psalm 2. The Online Bible Millennium Edition, version 1.2. Winterbourne Ontario, Canada. 2001



Jamieson, Fausset, Brown. Jamieson, Fausset, Brown Commentary. The Online Bible Millennium Edition, version 1.2. Winterbourne Ontario, Canada. 2001



Malick, David. The Book of Psalms. http://www.bible.org/docs/ot/books/psa/ps-intr.htm



Poole, Mathew. Mathew Poole’s Commentary of the Bible Rev 2:27. The Online Bible Millennium Edition, version 1.2. Winterbourne Ontario, Canada. 2001.



The Online Bible Millennium Edition Version 1.2. Smith’s Revised Bible Dictionary 1999, “Babylon”. Winterbourne Ontario, Canada. 2001



Walvoord, John F. and Roy B. Zuck. The Bible Knowledge Commentary, An Exposition of Scriptures by Dallas Seminary Faculty, Old Testament. Colorado Springs, Colorado. Cook Communications Ministries, 2004.







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[1] The Online Bible Millennium Edition Version 1.2. Smith’s Revised Bible Dictionary 1999, “Pharisees”. Winterbourne Ontario, Canada. 2001



[2] Malick, David. The Book of Psalms. http://www.bible.org/docs/ot/books/psa/ps-intr.htm.



[3] Gill, John. John Gill’s Expositor. The Online Bible Millinium Edition, version 1.2. Winterbourne Ontario, Canada. 2001



[4] Malick, David. The Book of Psalms. http://www.bible.org/docs/ot/books/psa/ps-intr.htm



[5] Henry, Mathew. Mathew Henry Commentary Psalm 2:3. The Online Bible Millinium Edition, version 1.2. Winterbourne Ontario, Canada. 2001



[6]Copeland, Mark A. Executable Outlines, Psalm 2: 2004. http://www.ccel.org



[7] Walvoord, John F. and Roy B. Zuck. The Bible Knowledge Commentary, An Exposition of Scriptures by Dallas Seminary Faculty, Old Testament. Colorado Springs, Colorado. Cook Communications Ministries, 2004.



[8] Jamieson, Fausset, Brown. Jamieson, Fausset, Brown Commentary. The Online Bible Millennium Edition, version 1.2. Winterbourne Ontario, Canada. 2001



[9] Henry, Mathew. Mathew Henry Commentary Psalm 2. The Online Bible Millennium Edition, version 1.2. Winterbourne Ontario, Canada. 2001



[10] Poole, Mathew. Mathew Poole’s Commentary of the Bible Rev 2:27. The Online Bible Millennium Edition, version 1.2. Winterbourne Ontario, Canada. 2001.

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